Northcliff - JHB

Mon-Fri: 7h00 - 19h00

073 731 3945

Call or WhatsApp

Growing needn’t be a pain

Growth spurts and growing pains are a fact of life, but there’s no reason for your child to miss out on normal activities – if the pain is that serious, there may be an underlying issue that can be treated through physiotherapy.

Explore Topics

growing pains
If your child has ‘growing pains’ that are serious enough to stop them doing normal activities, the chances are that these aren’t growing pains at all, but a different issue that we may be able to help with.

1. GROWING PAINS

Growing pains are actually muscular rather than in the joints, and they’re not related to how active a day your child has had.

How you can provide relief

  • Apply heat to the affected area
  • Encourage your child to stretch gently
  • Massage can also help
  • You can also give them Nurofen for pain relief (on medical advice)

2. GROWTH SPURTS

Most people only reach their full height at around the age of 18. Until then, growth can occur in fits and starts – it is not always a smooth, regular process.

Growth takes place from the ends of the long bones, and this can cause tendons to pull on the cartilage, resulting in irritation or even pain.

Small lumps may result from overloading. This isn’t usually a problem but is something that you should keep an eye on.

How lifestyle can help

  • Ensure your child gets enough sleep
  • Provide healthy nutrition
  • Encourage them to be active and take part in sports

The following syndromes are commonly associated with childhood growth spurts:

SINDING-LARSON JOHANSSON SYNDROME (SLJ)

  • Typically experience by children aged 9 – 14 who do a lot of running and jumping.
    Pain at the base of the kneecap is caused by overuse.
  • Growth can cause repetitive strain on the kneecap growth plate, leading to swelling and irritation.
  • Straightening the leg can stress the growth plate, but this is a temporary condition that will end when the growth spurt does.


OSGOOD-SCHLATTER DISEASE

  • Pain may be experienced at the top of the shin bone.
  • Like SLJ, it will get better over time, but can last for up to a year.
  • Most common between 12 and 15.
  • Boys are more likely to experience this than girls, especially is they do a lot of sport involving jumping and sprinting.


SEVER’S DISEASE

Pain in the back of the heel and underneath it, caused by inflammation of the growth plate in the heel.

This condition is aggravated by being physically active – it results from overuse or repetitive strain.

Managing and treating these conditions.

  • Use ice after training or exercise
  • Stretching and strapping can help
  • Change activity patterns if pain is severe
  • Use ibuprofen if recommended by a doctor
  • Biomechanical changes (we can help with these)
  • Changing or adjusting shoes, or getting orthotics
  • Rehabilitation through physiotherapy

 

WHEN TO SEEK HELP

If the pain doesn’t interfere with an activity, or that improves after just a day of rest, then your child can continue to do it. At the same time, it’s important to remember than pain is a message from your body, and shouldn’t be ignored. ‘Pushing through’ or using painkillers and anti-inflammatories to disguise the pain can make things worse, and lengthen the rehabilitation process.

BAILEY HENCHIE PHYSIOTHERAPY INC

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Bailey & Henchie Physiotherapy

Explore more articles from our Therapy Hub

growing pains
Learners & Students
Bailey Henchie Physiotherapy Inc.

Growing needn’t be a pain

Growth spurts and growing pains are a fact of life, but there’s no reason for your child to miss out on normal activities – if the pain is that serious, there may be an underlying issue that can be treated through physiotherapy.

Read More »
×

Powered by WhatsApp Chat

× WhatsApp us now!